Deprivation Binge

How much sleep is too much? Study reveals how your snooze pattern can contribute to

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Excess of everything is bad, and the same goes for sleep

Excess of everything is bad, and the same goes for sleep&nbsp | &nbspPhoto Credit:&nbspiStock Images

Key Highlights

  • Sleeping for less than seven hours is linked to increased intake of sugar, carbohydrates, caffeine and fats
  • People who reduced their sleep hours from seven to five were at a 1.7 times higher risk of death
  • The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a little over seven hours of sleep for adults aged 18 to 60

New Delhi: Being sleep deprived is a serious health problem, one that often is undermined for the possible health risks involved. Tossing and turning for multiple nights due to stress, anxiety, depression or even the effect of too much caffeine induces irritability and binge-eating patterns, and may even impact quality of work through the day. However, a new study has now shed light on how sleeping too much can have side effects on health – mostly importantly, on risk of obesity.

Lack of sleep and risk of health woes: The link explained

Too much or too less, messed up sleep patterns may not necessarily improve health. According to a recent study published in the journal of American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, sleeping for less than seven hours is linked to increased intake of sugar, carbohydrates, caffeine and fats as opposed to those who had a longer duration of sleep. And if a patient has family history of obesity or witnesses increase in body weight over time, getting more sleep at night is recommended for a healthier body mass index (BMI).

Experts further added that poor food choices, increased screen time and lack of physical activity further anchor the effect of sleep deprivation on obesity risk. But that’s not all, according to a study conducted by experts from the University of Warwick, people who reduced their sleep hours from seven to five were at a 1.7 times higher risk of death and twice as likely to deal with heart diseases as opposed to those who got more sleep.

Excess sleep and obesity: How too much sleep affects help

Excess of everything is bad, and the same goes for sleep. While sleeping too less can induce anxiety, sleeping too much can contribute to obesity. A new study published in the journal Sleep, it was discovered that people who slept for nine to ten hours were at a 21% higher risk of obesity. On one hand, while children can benefit from longer sleep duration, adults benefit most from a seven to eight-hour sleep.

The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a little over seven hours of sleep for adults aged 18 to 60. After 60, seven to nine hours of sleep is recommended.

Disclaimer: Tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are for general information purpose only and should not be construed as professional medical advice. Always consult your doctor or a dietician before starting any fitness programme or making any changes to your diet.

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